jQuery Tutorials for Designers

jQuery is a great library for animation and Ajax calls. As with any JavaScript library there are different objects and name spaces to learn. Well, over at Web Designer Wall they have put together a good tutorial about using jQuery. The tutorial is written from a designers stand point, but even an experienced hard-core web programmer can find this tutorial useful.

Below is an excerpt from the post:

How jQuery works?

First you need to download a copy of jQuery and insert it in your html page (preferably within the <head> tag). Then you need to write functions to tell jQuery what to do. The diagram below explains the detail how jQuery work:

how jquery works

How to get the element?

Writing jQuery function is relatively easy (thanks to the wonderful documentation). The key point you have to learn is how to get the exact element that you want to apply the effects.

  • $("#header") = get the element with id="header"
  • $("h3") = get all <h3> element
  • $("div#content .photo") = get all element with class="photo" nested in the <div id="content">
  • $("ul li") = get all <li> element nested in all <ul>
  • $("ul li:first") = get only the first <li> element of the <ul>

1. Simple slide panel

Let’s start by doing a simple slide panel. You’ve probably seen a lot of this, where you click on a link and a panel slide up/down. (view demo)

sample

When an elment with class="btn-slide" is clicked, it will slideToggle (up/down) the <div id="panel"> element and then toggle a CSS class="active" to the <a class="btn-slide"> element. The .active class will toggle the background position of the arrow image (by CSS).

$(document).ready(function(){

	$(".btn-slide").click(function(){
	  $("#panel").slideToggle("slow");
	  $(this).toggleClass("active");
	});

});

2. Simple disappearing effect

This sample will show you how to make something disappear when an image button is clicked. (view demo)

sample

When the <img class="delete"> is clicked, it will find its parent element <div class="pane"> and animate its opacity=hide with slow speed.

$(document).ready(function(){

	$(".pane .delete").click(function(){
	  $(this).parents(".pane").animate({ opacity: "hide" }, "slow");
	});

});

3 Chain-able transition effects

Now let’s see the power of jQuery’s chainability. With just several lines of code, I can make the box fly around with scaling and fading transition. (view demo)

sample

Line 1: when the <a class="run"> is clicked

Line 2: animate the <div id="box"> opacity=0.1, left property until it reaches 400px, with speed 1200 (milliseconds)
Line 3: then opacity=0.4, top=160px, height=20, width=20, with speed "slow"
Line 4: then opacity=1, left=0, height=100, width=100, with speed "slow"

Line 5: then opacity=1, left=0, height=100, width=100, with speed "slow"
Line 6: then top=0, with speed "fast"
Line 7: then slideUp (default speed = "normal")
Line 8: then slideDown, with speed "slow"

Line 9: return false will prevent the browser jump to the link anchor

$(document).ready(function(){

	$(".run").click(function(){

	  $("#box").animate({opacity: "0.1", left: "+=400"}, 1200)
	  .animate({opacity: "0.4", top: "+=160", height: "20", width: "20"}, "slow")
	  .animate({opacity: "1", left: "0", height: "100", width: "100"}, "slow")
	  .animate({top: "0"}, "fast")
	  .slideUp()
	  .slideDown("slow")
	  return false;

	});

});

4a. Accordion #1

Here is a sample of accordion. (view demo)

sample

The first line will add a CSS class "active" to the first <H3> element within the <div class="accordion"> (the "active" class will shift the background position of the arrow icon). The second line will hide all the <p> element that is not the first within the <div class="accordion">.

When the <h3> element is clicked, it will slideToggle the next <p> and slideUp all its siblings, then toggle the class="active".

$(document).ready(function(){

	$(".accordion h3:first").addClass("active");
	$(".accordion p:not(:first)").hide();

	$(".accordion h3").click(function(){

	  $(this).next("p").slideToggle("slow")
	  .siblings("p:visible").slideUp("slow");
	  $(this).toggleClass("active");
	  $(this).siblings("h3").removeClass("active");

	});

});

4b. Accordion #2

This example is very similar to accordion#1, but it will let you specify which panel to open as default. (view demo)

In the CSS stylesheet, set .accordion p to display:none. Now suppose you want to open the third panel as default. You can write as $(".accordion2 p").eq(2).show(); (eq = equal). Note that the indexing starts at zero.

$(document).ready(function(){

	$(".accordion2 h3").eq(2).addClass("active");
	$(".accordion2 p").eq(2).show();

	$(".accordion2 h3").click(function(){
	  $(this).next("p").slideToggle("slow")
	  .siblings("p:visible").slideUp("slow");
	  $(this).toggleClass("active");
	  $(this).siblings("h3").removeClass("active");
	});

});

You can read the full post here.
You can also view the demo here or download the demo code here.

jQuery is one library that I really recommend using. The library is very well written and is pretty easy to learn fairly quickly. If you haven't used the library before this is a good tutorial to start with.

hi, how can I modify the simple slide panel to make it slide from the left side of the page towards the middle (instead of from top to bottom)?

I believe you would change the CSS property of #panel. In the example the code is:

#panel {
background: #754c24;
height: 200px;
display: none;
}

You could change it to something like
#panel {
background: #754c24;
height: 200px;
marginLeft: "0.6in"
display: none;
}

You would then use the animate procedure instead of slideToggle.

You and learn about the animated procedure at http://docs.jquery.com/Effects/animate#paramsdurationeasingcallback

I believe that this should be what you need for it grow horizontal although you may have to play with it the CSS a bit to get it how you want.

hey, thanks for the help, i thought i'd post my revision for anyone else who wanted to use it: Here.

correct link:

[...] Original post by David Hurth [...]

[...] jQuery Tutorials for Designers | Ajaxonomy for the designers in your life [...]

[...] jQuery Tutorials for Designers [...]

Cool samples!!!

this is a great intro to jquery, helped me out a lot good stuff!

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