Why XML is far superior to JSON

Tagged:  

I've read an article titled Does XML have a future on the web?, and it does not surprise me, because the author himself is the creator of JSON. Naturally, he would love to promote his stuff. I would like to ignore him but would like to address his questions.

Lets see what he got.

"For data transfer applications, XML is losing ground to JSON because JSON is simply a better data transfer format".
I want to know how? Everyone in the world knows XML is more recognized and widely used and it is well supported by every one of the vendors in the web world (Editors, Application Servers, Parsers, Web Servers, Loaders etc.). JSON's role is what? Simply converting raw text in to a JavaScript object. And how is that a better data transfer format? Can I take the same raw text and use it else where? I don't think so.

I heard there are some frameworks available for JSLT (yeah you heard it right, JavaScript - SLT) available as open source, still I would challenge the performance about those frameworks. I haven't tried them myself, but you cannot beat the performance provided by the native browser XSLTs. I could reuse same XML data and apply different XSLTs to get different sets of transformed structures. You can't even think about this using JSON. And that to you can transform using XSLT's in milliseconds. With JavaScript JSON, you'll be lucky if you can get it in seconds.

Also, what about reusability? My server still can send the same XML and I could put a SOAP wrapper on top of that and I could expose it to web services. Now anybody can invoke that web service. Not necessarily only on the web side, it could be invoked by any server side programs as well. XML is the de-facto standard for Data integration projects, Data warehousing projects. More and more corporations are moving towards a SOA (Service oriented architecture) model and more and more applications have to use XML as the data transport mechanism.

JSON may be used by applications which are not enterprise level, only for applications which deal with less data, and have no need for extensibility. But for more scalability, more robustness, and more extensibility, XML is your best bet. XML has more support and that's what your boss would like to hear.

OpenID: Do you Yahoo!?

Yahoo! has just announced that it would begin supporting OpenID 2.0 technology for both yahoo.com and flikr.com by the end of the month.

Yahoo!’s initial OpenID service, which will be available in public beta on January 30, enables a seamless and transparent web experience by allowing users to use their custom OpenID identifier on me.yahoo.com or to simply type in “www.yahoo.com” or “www.flickr.com” on any site that supports OpenID 2.0.

Full Press Release

With the addition of 248 million Yahoo! users, the OpenID user community essentially triples in size (going from an estimated 120 million users to 368 million).

More information regarding Yahoo!'s OpenID support can be found here.

Find the Stories Digg Doesn't want You to Find

Tagged:  

Ajaxonomy's Digg Bury Recorder has added a new feature, you can now see the top buried stories. Our hope with this new feature is that you might find interesting stories that you may not otherwise know about.

You can also search for the top buried stories for a particular subject. So, if you want to see the top buried Ron Paul stories, just search for Ron Paul and you will get quite a few results. Another couple of searches to try are iPhone and SEO.

The Top Buried stories are based on data from Ajaxonomy's Bury Recorder (some have started referring to it as ABR). ABR gets the bury data from all upcoming and popular stories, however once the story is fully buried (or auto buried which would possibly show no buries) it will not record any buries from the story as it has been fully buried. This means if a story is fully buried the last recorded bury is the bury that pushed it over the edge.

We hope that this list will be a welcome addition to the ABR. If you have any suggestions or questions about the ABR please leave a comment or if you think it would make a good blog post then sign up for a free account on this blog and write a story about it.

The below links will take you to the Ajaxonomy's Bury Recorder new feature and the application.
Digg's Top Buried Stories
Ajaxonomy's Bury Recorder

iGoogle Themes API is Now Available

Tagged:  

You've all used (or heard of) the iGoogle portal and probably have seen its many cool themes. Google has now opened up a Themes API to allow designers to build their own themes.

3 Steps to Building a Theme
1) designing images for the header and footer
2) entering metadata and color information in an XML file
3) and submitting the theme.

To find out more about the API, start with the developer guide.

Also check out these example themes, which, along with themes you submit, will be available in the new themes directory for the millions of iGoogle users:

Earth-light by Yves Behar, founder of the San Francisco design studio fuseproject:

Adventures in Lollipopland by Mark Frauenfelder, writer, illustrator, co-founder of Boing Boing, and editor-in-chief of Make Magazine:

Supermoto Mayhem by Troy Lee, designer and founder of Troy Lee Designs:

Simplicity is Complex by John Maeda, graphic designer, artist, Associate Director of Research at the MIT Media Laboratory, and recently named as the next President of the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD):

Visit the Themes API Homepage

MooTools 1.2 Beta 2 Released

Tagged:  

MooTools has released what will likely be the last beta for version 1.2 of their framework. Here's what you'll find in this new release:

1) Documentation - it's said to be almost 5 times more detailed than version 1.

Every class option has now its description, every method has a complete list of arguments along with description, type, and now every functionality comes with a code example -- sometimes more than one. If you want to see it for yourself, here is the temporary link for the 1.2 beta documentation.

2) Element Accessors

Example - working with the href attribute

$(element).set('href', 'http://mad4milk.net'); //setter
$(element).get('href'); //getter



Example - setting the default morph options

$(element).set('morph', {duration: 100, transition: 'quart:out'});

Now when we call the morph method on the element, the default options will be set.

$(element).morph({height: 200, width: 200});



Example - set method now accepts any Object containing any of the settable properties

$(element).set({
    href: 'http://mad4milk.net',
    text: 'mad4milk website',
    morph: {duration: 200, transition: 'quad:out'},
    events: {
        click: function(){
            document.location.href = this.href;
            return false;
        }
    }
});

Element Accessor Public API - you can create a single "special attribute" that will be able to set a multiple attributes of an element. For more info, check out the documentation.

3) Fully redesigned dimension system - it's now much easier to get window or element dimensions, scrolling offsets, visible height or the full scroll height. For more info, check out the documentation.

Read the full announcement for MooTools 1.2 Beta 2

If you're wondering what changes were in MooTools 1.2 Beta 1, read more about it here.

Initial Draft Specification for "OpenAjax Metadata"

Tagged:  

News from the OpenAjax Alliance! The IDE Working Group and Gadgets Task Force have completed an initial draft of the “OpenAjax Metadata Specification". The Metadata spec represents a standard for interoperability across the Ajax toolkits we know and love. Here are the metadata items defined in this first draft version:

  • Ajax widgets - the spec defines two definitions for "widget"
    • UI controls - Some Ajax libraries provide a set of user interface building block components such as combo boxes, menu bars, or charts
    • Mashup components (aka “widgets” and “gadgets”) - Mashup frameworks allow for pre-packaged mini-applications (sometimes called “widgets” or “gadgets”) to be combined together within a composite application (the “mashup”), where the mashup components react to each other intelligently, such as when the user selects an address in one component which causes a different component to display an updated map that shows the given address.
  • Ajax APIs - the spec provides a set of metadata that describes runtime JavaScript APIs (like classes and methods) available for an Ajax library.
  • Ajax libraries - includes metadata fields similar to entries in the OpenAjax Registry

The primary target consumers of OpenAjax Metadata 1.0 are software products. It is expected that these software products will consume and use the metadata to provide enhanced experience for users who building Ajax-powered solutions. In particular:

* Mashup frameworks will use OpenAjax Metadata to use OpenAjax Metadata for widgets, such as the message types that the widget produces and consumes and the customization parameters that the widget supports

* Ajax IDEs will use OpenAjax Metadata to provide the developer with (presumably automatically-generated) API documentation, intelligent code-assist, widget palettes, and widget property editors

The draft specification can be found here.

Click here to read the announcement from the OpenAjax Alliance

Top 5 GWT Libraries

Tagged:  

GWTSite held a contest asking users to vote for their favorite GWT third-party library, and as a result have compiled their own list of the top five most popular GWT third-party libraries.

Here they are:

5. Hibernate4gwt
Bruno Marchesson
For any Hibernate users out there, Hibernate4gwt allows you to painlessly use your Hibernate POJOs with GWT.

4. Gwittir
Robert Cooper and Charlie Collins
The Gwittir project provides a lot of interesting modules for your GWT projects including data-binding, animation, introspection, and more.

3. GWT-SL
George Georgovassilis
As the name implies, the GWT Server Library is it is a server-side library for GWT that focuses on providing Spring Framework integration by allowing you to expose your Spring beans as RPC services. It also provides integration with the hibernate4gwt library.

2. GWT-Ext
Sanjiv Jivan
GWT-Ext is a really nice looking GWT widget library that is closely integrated with the Ext JS library. Take a look at the GWT-Ext Showcase Demo.

1. MyGWT
Darrell Meyer
mygwt
MyGWT was the overwhelming favorite in the contest with almost half the vote. It is a pure GWT widget library which shares the Ext JS L&F to create a polished set of widgets for use in your GWT applications. Take a look at the MyGWT Explorer Demo.

Honorable mentions: gwt-dnd, gwt-log, gwt-maven, gwtwindowmanager, gwt-math

Click here to read the original post on GWT Site.

Let us know which GWT library you prefer.

Sun acquires MySQL

Tagged:  

It's happened. This morning, Sun Microsystems announced plans to acquire MySQL AB. Reactions have been mixed, including excitement, pride, disbelief and satisfaction, but also anxiety.

Sun has been a leader in the open source community, just look at: Java, OpenSolaris, Open Office / Star Office, GlassFish app server, and the NetBeans IDE for starters. So, it can't be all bad that they've acquired MySQL, right?

The question stirring up some anxiety is: will MySQL’s support for other programming languages and operating systems now be given less attention due to Sun's vested interest in, and success with, Java and Solaris?

Here's the answer from Sun's blog:

Absolutely not. MySQL is still being managed by the same people, and the charter is still the same. There is no need for reducing the set of platforms or languages. It only makes sense for us to continue to support defacto Web development standards like LAMP, as well as emerging ones like Ruby and Eclipse. This deal is about addition, not subtraction.

What does all of this mean for the developer community? Hopefully just some added value to MySQL due to the immediate access to technical, marketing, OSS developer relations it will now have.

Read more about the acquisition over at Kaj Arno's MySQL blog or the press announcement on Sun's website.

Three New Semantic Web Standards for SPARQL

Tagged:  

The World Wide Web Consortium has published three new Semantic Web standards for SPARQL. SPARQL is the query language for the Semantic Web. SPARQL queries hide the details of data management, which lowers costs and increases robustness of data integration on the Web.

"Trying to use the Semantic Web without SPARQL is like trying to use a relational database without SQL," explained Tim Berners-Lee, W3C Director.

The three new standars for SPARQL are:
* SPARQL Query Language for RDF
* SPARQL Protocol for RDF
* SPARQL Query Results XML Format

Read the press release, testimonials and learn more about the Semantic Web Activity.

AjaxMGraph v0.96 Released

Tagged:  

Version 0.96 of AjaxMGraph, an Ajax based graphing library built on the Prototype JavaScript framework, was released today and is available for download.

Updates in this new release:
* Added Option to draw two or more graphs
* Code modified to be more user friendly, and up to date with modern standards

* View a Demo

* Download (zip, 14KB)

Syndicate content